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Live Plant Specimens >> Flowering plants


Brassica Speed Seeds

Brassica Speed Seeds

Brassica is a genus of plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The members of the genus may be collectively known either as cabbages, or as mustards.

This genus is remarkable for containing more important agricultural and horticultural crops than any other genus. It also includes a number of weeds, both wild taxa and escapees from cultivation. It includes over 30 wild species and hybrids, and numerous additional cultivars and hybrids of cultivated origin. Most are annuals or biennials, but some are small shrubs.

The genus is native in the wild in western Europe, the Mediterranean and temperate regions of Asia. In addition to the cultivated species, which are grown worldwide, many of the wild species grow as weeds, especially in North America, South America, and Australia.

Almost all parts of some species or other have been developed for food, including the root (swedes, turnips), stems (kohlrabi), leaves (cabbage, brussels sprouts), flowers (cauliflower, broccoli), and seeds (many, including mustard seed, oilseed rape). Some forms with white or purple foliage or flowerheads, are also sometimes grown for ornament.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Brassica Speed Seeds - 50pk $ 13.00
Brassica Speed Seeds - 200pk $ 32.00
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Cabomba Plants

Cabomba Plants

Cabombaceae is the botanical name of a family of flowering plants. Such a family has been recognised by at least some taxonomists.

The APG II system, of 2003 (unchanged from the APG system, of 1998), does not recognise such a family, at least as such: the plants in question are included in family Nymphaeaceae. However, APG II does allow this as an optional segregate. In that case the family is unplaced as to order: it is not placed at all beyond being accepted among the most basic lineages in the clade angiosperms.

The family consists of two genera (Brasenia and Cabomba, totalling half-a-dozen species, of aquatic plants.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Cabomba Plants pk/7 $ 2.10
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Elodea (Anacharis)

Elodea (Anacharis)

Elodea is a genus of aquatic plants often called the Water weeds. Elodea is native to North America and it is also widely used as aquarium vegetation. The introduction of some species of Elodea into waterways in parts of Europe, the Australia, Africa, Asia, and New Zealand has created a significant problem, and it is now considered a noxious weed in these areas.

Elodea canadensis, sometimes called American or Canadian waterweed/pondweed or Anacharis (a former scientific name) is widely known as the generic water weed. The use of these names causes it to be confused with similar-looking non-native plants, like Brazilian elodea (Egeria densa) or hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata). American waterweed is an attractive aquarium plant, and is a good substitute for Brazilian elodea.

The American waterweed lives entirely underwater with the exception of small white flowers which bloom at the surface and are attached to the plant by delicate stalks. It produces winter buds from the stem tips that overwinter on the lake bottom. It also often overwinters as an evergreen plant in mild climates. In the fall, leafy stalks will detach from the parent plant, float away, root, and start new plants. This is the American waterweed's most important method of spreading, with seed production playing a relatively minor role.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Elodea (Anacharis) - Class 9 $ 2.97
Elodea (Anacharis) - Class 30 $ 6.30
Elodea Tips (Anacharis) - Class 30 $ 11.00
Elodea (Anacharis) - Class 60 $ 12.00
Elodea Tips (Anacharis) - Class 60 $ 20.40
Elodea (Anacharis) - Class 120 $ 22.80
Elodea (Anacharis) - Class 12 $ 3.96
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Gymnosperm (Tree Seedlings)

Gymnosperm (Tree Seedlings)

Gymnosperms (Gymnospermae) are a group of seed-bearing plants which bear seeds on cone-like structures rather than inside fruit. The term gymnosperm comes from the Greek word gumnospermos, translated literally "naked seed". The name points out that the seeds are not formed in ovules or found inside fruit, as they are in angiosperms, but are found naked on the scales of a cone or similar structure.

The production of seeds distinguishes the gymnosperms (along with the angiosperms) from other members of the vascular plants. Thus together they are called seed plants (Spermatophyta).

Gymnosperms are heterosporous, producing microspores that develop into pollen grains and megaspores that are retained in an ovule. After fertilization (joining of the micro- and megaspore), the resulting embryo, along with other cells comprising the ovule, develops into a seed. The seed is a sporophyte resting stage.

In early classification schemes, the gymnosperms (Gymnospermae) "naked seed" plants were regarded as a "natural" group. However, certain fossil discoveries suggest that the angiosperms evolved from a gymnosperm ancestor, which would make the gymnosperms a paraphyletic group if all extinct taxa are included. Modern cladistics only accepts taxa that are monophyletic, traceable to a common ancestor and inclusive of all descendants of that common ancestor.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Gymnospern (Tree Seedling) - Each $ 2.70
Gymnosperm (Tree Seedlings) - 7/pk $ 18.90
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Hornwort (Ceratophyllum)

Hornwort is a common name used to describe two completely unrelated type of plants.  What we carry is an aquatic which resembles Cabomba and is used as a substitute for Cabomba.  Hornworts are a group of bryophytes, or non-vascular plants, comprising the division Anthocerotophyta.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Hornwort (Ceratophyllum) - Class 12 $ 3.50
Hornwort (Ceratophyllum) - Class 30 $ 5.50
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Lemna (Duckweed)

Lemna (Duckweed)Lemna is a genus of free-floating aquatic plants from the duckweed family. The duckweeds have been classified as a separate family, the Lemnaceae, but some researchers (the AGP II) consider the duckweeds members of the Araceae.

Lemna species grow as simple free-floating thalli on or just beneath the water surface. Most are small, not exceeding 5 mm in length, except Lemna trisulca which is elongated and has a branched structure. Lemna thalli have a single root, which distingushes them from related species Spirodela and Landoltia

The plants grow mainly by vegetative reproduction, two daughter plants bud off from the adult plant. This form of growth allows very rapid colonisation of new water. Duckweeds are flowering plants, and nearly all of them are known to reproduce sexually, flowering and producing seed under appropriate conditions. Certain duckweeds (e.g. L. gibba) are long day plants, while others (e.g. L. minor) are short day plants.

When Lemna invades a waterway, it can be removed mechanically, by the addition of herbivorous fish (e.g. grass carp) or treated with a herbicide.

The rapid growth of duckweeds finds application in bioremediation of polluted waters and as test organisms for environmental studies. It is also being used as an expression system for economical prodution of complex biopharmaceuticals.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Lemna (Duckweed) - Class 12 $ 3.25
Lemna (Duckweed) - Class 30 $ 4.50
Lemna (Duckweed) - Class 60 $ 8.00
Lemna (Duckweed) - Class 120 $ 13.00
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Parrot Feather

Parrot FeatherParrot feather is a flowering plant - a vascular dicot - also commonly called water milfoils. Its scientific name is Myriophyllum aquaticum.

Parrot feather is native to the Amazon River in South America - however, it can be found worldwide now. It is thought that this plant was introduced to North America around the 1800s. As it prefers a warmer climate, it is chiefly found in the southern parts of the United States. Parrot feather is a fresh-water plant; it can be found in lakes, ponds, and streams.

Parrot feather is a perennial plant. As the water warms in the spring, parrot feather begins to flourish. Most plants flower in the spring; however, some also flower in the fall. Flowers of this plant are very small and white in color. Almost all plants of this species are female, in fact there are no male plants found outside of South America. Seeds are not produced in any North American plants. Parrot feather reproduces asexually. New plants grow from fragments of already rooted plants.

Description Price SelectQuantity
Parrot Feather - Class 12 $ 5.00
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Wolffia

Wolffia is a thick, granular floating plant with rootlets.  It also has the distinction of being the smallest Angiosperm.
Description Price SelectQuantity
Wolffia-Class 12 $ 3.75
Wolffia -Class 30 $ 4.90
Wolffia-Class 60 $ 8.50
Wolffia-Class120 $ 14.50
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Niles Biological, Inc.
9298 Elder Creek Road
Sacramento, CA 95829
(916) 386-2665